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I 

IN the adapt~tion to Mr. Walter Crane·s 
homely ditties I have rather aimed at simplicity and a somewhat 

countrified manner than an air of archa::ology. \\'1th some, I have 

taken a singer's license in the way of slight alterations. I might call 

them ·•individualities:" much as a country-piper might t ike with tunes 

so familiar as to become almost a part of himself. I need hardly say 

that the task which has been one of extreme delight to me. \\'011ld 

have been most difficult, perhaps impossible. "·ithout the learned and 

well-known selections of Mr. Chappell and Mr. Hullah. I have also 

to thank Mr. Stanly Lucas for permission to include l\Ir. Lawson's 
setting of the old "Come live with me." \Ve had intended to gather 

only from an old-world garden-the pansy and marjoram of song as it 

were-but we were frail before 1\Tr Lawson's tudoresque and most 

sympathetic melody. 
l1ffn. J\T.\RZTAL~. 

I, 

\ 



9. THE PASSIONATE SHEPHERD. 
10 . PASTD!.,; WITH GOOD COMPANY. 

TllE lll; .'H IS UP. 

JOG O'.\'. 
13. IT \VAS A LOVER AND HIS LASS. 
14. JN THE MERRY MONTH 0-F MAY. 
1y. PHILLIDA FLOUTS ME. 

MY LODGING IS ON THE COLD GROUi\D. 

Ii· A POOR BEGGAR'S DAt:GHTER. 
18. THE BAILIFF'S DAUGHTER. 

19. THE SPANISH LADY. 

:~: }TO ALL YOU LADIES. 
DRINK TO il!E ONLY \\'l'TH THINE EYES. 

23. NOW, 0 NOW, I J\'EEDS MUST PART. 
24. 0 MISTRESS MINE. 
25. LOVE WILL FIND OU r THE WAY. 
26
· 1 THE SEEDS OF LOVE. 

27. 5 
28. EARLY ONE MORNING. 
29. 0 , WILLOW, WILLOW. 
30. THE THREE RAVENS. 

31. SIR SIMON DE MONT.FORT, 

3
2
· 1 THE LEATHER BOTTEL. 

33 ) 
34. THE HUNTER IN HIS CAREER. 
35. WE BE SOLDIERS THJZEE. 
36. THE GIRL I'VE LEFT BEH IND ME. 

37. BLACK-EYED SUSAN. 
38. WE BE THREE POOR MAR INERS. 

39. THE MERMAID. 
40. IT WAS A MAID OF MY COUKTREE. 

41. MY LADY GREENSLEEVES. 

42. BARBARA ALLEN. 

43. SALLY IN OUR ALLEY. 
44- HOW SHOULD I YOUR TRUE LOVE KNOW. 

45 . NEAR WOODSTOCK TOW:\. 
46. SINCE FIRST I SAW YOUR FACE. 
47. WHEN THE BRIGHT GOD OF DA\'. 
48. WHO LIVETH SO MERRY. 

49. COME LASSES AND LADS. 
50. PHILLIS ON THE NEW MADE HAY. 

SI. HARVEST HOME. 

The music or "The Pac;sionatc Shepherd .. (M. L .. wso'l) is copyright, as also arc th.c accompaniments or the other songs, as well as the dcsign<1 
in this book. We have to thank Messrs. MACMILLAN AN"D Co. for their courtesy in allowing us to m::ikc use of Mr. CHAPPELL's 

".Popu\ap Music of the Olden Time," and Mc.--srs. STANLY LUCAS AND Co. for Mr. LAWSON'S song. 



Come live ,,ith me and be my love, And we will all the plea - sures prove. That 

c~=~:.~~~~~~ 

?j There we will sit upon the r-0cks, l There will I make thee beds of roses, 
And see the shepherds fee' 

1. Will you bear a Span- ish la · dy- How she wooed an Eng-lish - man I Gar-ment 

{o!ff=:J™~. ~--~w~~=-=ii: 1 ll ~!~ f · 1' .. ·• _. ~ i-. f r · ~ ._. I • 1'°" m~::::::::::::3-:J!-7~~r---~="-_ ... J!~~--~-- ==::;i=tl-· - I r--~---r-- --
grace was ~; And, by bi~h a~~ p::;::::e, of b~ ~ • g;::: 

[~~~=~~~~~~~•™3¥ID ) ~--==- ~----· _, _, '....J' -c._--- 1'- tr-=:_: ___, ~ .... 
J r:.... •-====:=- 1 ~-5' 1; tempo. t~~~--€;~~$tj=i~=@~ ~r=bl=J~~ _ TF" 

As his pris'ner there he kept her ; Serpents lie where flowers grow." . 
On his hands her life did lye; "AU the harm I wish to thee, most courteous kmght, 

Cupid's bands did tye them faster God grant the same upon my head may light. 
By the liking of an eye: 

In his courteous company was all her joy~ 
To favour him sh~ was not coy. 

But at last there came commandment 
For to set the ladies free, 

With their jewels still adornM-
None to do them injury : 

Then said this lady mild-'' Full woe is me; 
Let me still sustain this kind captivity!" 

"How should'st thou, fair lady, love me 
\,Yhom thou know'st thy country's foe? 

Thv fair words make me suspect thf'e: 

•'Oh, how happy is that woman 
That enjoys so true a friend! 

l\Iany happy days God send her!-
Of my suit I make an end : 

On my knees I pardon crave for my offence, 
\Yhich from love and true affection dirl commence. 

" I3lessed be. the time and season 
That you came on Spanish ground; 

If you may our foes be term~d. 
Gentle foes we have you found: 

~'ith our city, you have won our hearts each one, 
To your country bear away that is your own." 

u Courteous lad ye, leave this fancy;-
Here comes all that breeds the strife-

1 in England have already 
A sweet woman to my wife: 

I will not falsify my vow for gain, 
Nor for a ll the fairest dames that live in Spain.• 

I 

S "I will spend my days m prayer; 
Love and all his laws def ye; 

In a nunnery will I shroud me, 
Far from any companye: 

But ere my prayers have end, be sure of this-
To pray for thee, love, I will never miss. 

19 

" Thus farewell, most gallant captain. 
Farewell, too, my hearfs content! 

Count not Spanish ladies wanton, 
Though to thee my love was bent: 

Joy and true prosperity go slill with thee!" 
"The like fall ever to thy share, ladie." 





For though the muses should proye kind, 

And fill our empty brain; 

Yet if rough Neptune rouse the wind 

To wave the azure main, 

Our paper, pen, and ink, and we 

Roll up and down our ships at sea. 

\\"ith a fal la, &r. 

Then if we write not by each post, 

Think not we are unkind; 

Nor yet conclude your sh ips are lost, 

By Dutchmen or by wind: 

Our tears we'll send a speedier way-

The tide shall bring them twice a day. 

\ \"ith a fal la, &c. 

-I· 

The King, with wonder and surprise, 

Will swear the seas grow bold, 

Because the tides will higher rise 

Than e'er they us'd of old : 

But let him know it is our tears 

Bring floods of grief to Whitehall stairs. 

\\"i th a fal la, &c. 

5· 
Let wind and weather do its worst,-

Be you to us but kind,-

Let Dutchmen vapour, Spaniards curse, 

No sorrow we shall find: 

'Tis then no matter how things go, 
Or who's our fri end, or who's our foe. 

With a fal la, &c. 
Lo1rn DoRSF.T. 

21 



Or lea vi:: a kiss with - in the cup, And I'll not ask for wine;....... The 

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But might I of Jove's ' nee- tar sip, I would not change for thine .... 

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22 

But thou thereon didst only breathe 
And send'st it back to me-

Since when it grows and smells, I swear, 
Not of itself, but thee. 



a\N. OW 0 NOW I NEEDSJD 
M l.J:ST PAR..T. 

2 While I live T needs must love-
Love lives not when life is gone: 

Now1 at lo.st, despair doth prove 
Lo,1e divided Joveth none. 

Dear, when I from thee nm gone, 
Gone are all my joys at once! 

I loved thee, and thee alone, 
In whose love I joy~d once . 

.(\nd, although your ~ight l 1eave.-
S.ight whereif\ myjoys do lie-' :' 

Till that de\tth 'do · sense. betea~e .':· 
~ever SbJ!ll 'affectiqn die'.' 
' l :·~.· :_ .• ;... ' 

23 



i. 0 mis- tress mine, where are you rov - ing? 0 mis- tress mine, where are you rov -ing? 

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0 stay and hear your true love's coming, That can sing both high and low; Trip no fur-ther, 

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\Vhat is love ?-'tis not hereafter. 
Present mirth hath present laughter ; 
\Vhat's to come is still unsure; 

24 

In delay there lies no plenty;-
Then, come kiss me, sweet and twenty,-
Y outh's a stuff will not endure. 

SHAKESPEARE. 



Where there is no place 
For the glow-worm to lie · 

Where there is no space 
For receipt of a fly ; 

Where the midge dare not ,·enture, 
Lest herself fast she lay; 

If Love come he will enter, 
And soon find out his way. 

3· 

You may esteem him 
A child for his might ; 

Or you may deem him 
A coward from !us flight ; 

But if she whom Love doth honour 
Be concenl'd from the day, 

Set a thousand guards upon her, 
Lavi! will find out the way. 

25 

4· 

Some thi nk to lose him 
By having him confin'd ; 

And some do suppose him, 
Poor thing, to be blind ! 

But if ne'er so close you wall him-
Do the best that you may-

Blind Love, if so ye call him, 
Soon will find out his way. 

You may train the eagle 
To stoop to your fist ; 

Or you may inveigle 
The phrenix of the east · 

The lioness, ye ma v move 'her 
To give o'er her ·prey; 

But you'll never stop a Jover-
He will find out the way. 



small birds they do sing,.. When small birds they do sing ....... . 

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I I I ______., I 

My garden was planted full 

Of flowers everywhere, 

But for myself I could not choose 

The flower I held so clear. 

3· 

l\ly gardener was standing by, 
And he would choose for me : 



The primrose I did reject 

Because it came too soon ; 

The lily and- pink I overlooked, 

And vowed I would wait till June. 

5. 

In June came the rose so red, 
And that's the flower for me : 

But when I gathered the rose so dear, 

I gained but the willow-tree. 

Oh, the willow-tree will twist, 

And the willow-tree will twine : 

And I would I were in the young man's arms 

That ever has this heart of mine. 

r:i. 

My gardener, as he stood by, 

He bade rne take great care, 

For if I gathered the rose so red, 
There groweth up a sharp thorn there. 

8. 

I told him I'd take no care 

Till I did feel the smart, 

And still did press the rose so dear, 

T ill the thorn did pierce my hemt. 

9· 

A posy of hyssop I'll make, 

No other flower I'll touch, 

That all the world may plainly see 

I k,·e one flower too much. 

My garden is now run wild; 

\\'hen I shall plant anew, 

My bed, that once was filled with thyme, 

27 



3-
., Remember the vows that you made to your l\Iary ; 
Remember the bower where you vowed to be true: 

Oh, don 't deceive me I oh, never leave me I 
How could you use a poor maiden so?'" 

4-
Thus sung the poor maideri, her sorrow bewailiog, 
Thus sung the poor maid in the valley below: 

.. Oh, don't deceive me! oh, do not leave me! 
How could you use a poor maiden so?" 



2 He sighed in his singing and made a grt";H moan, 
Sing willow, &c. 

"I am dead to all pleasure, my true love she is gone," 
Oh! willow, &c. 

3 The mute ~ird sat by him, made tame by his moans, 
Sing willow, &c:. 

The true te:irs fell lrom him and melted the stones., 
Oh ~ willow, &c. 

4 Come. all you forsaken, and mourn you with me, 
Sin,!?' willow, &c. 

\\"ho si)enks of a false lcve, mine's falser than she. 
Oh! ~· illow . &c. 



3 II;s foi\Jl[ul 'l\O\\'ks abo1•~ liim fli:; 
Dow·n, hey do\\'n, &c. 

No bird of pre)' dare venture nigh; 
\\"[Lh a down. 4 She lifled up his lifeless head : Down, hey down, &c. 

30 

She kiss~d his wot1nds, \hctt "'ere so 1·ed i 
' With a ddwn. 

She buried him l)efore the prime;~ 
She died herself ere evecttime ; 

\Vith a down, &c. 



1. Sir Si - 111011 de .Mont - fort my sub - ject shall be: Once chief of all the great ba - rons was he; Yet 

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2 When the barons in arms did King Henry oppose, 
Sir Simon de Montfort their leader they chose ; 
A leader of courage undaunted was he. 
And ofttime he made their enern ies Aee 

5 Among the dead bodies all lifeless he lay, 
Till evening drew on of the following day, 
When by a young lady discovered was he-
And this was thy mother, my pretty Bessie I 

6 A baron's fair daughter stept forth in the night 
To search for her father, who fell in the fight, 
And seeing young Montfort, where gasping he lay, 
Was moved with pity and brought him away. 

3 At length, in the battle on Evesham Plain, 
The barons were routed and Montfort was slain : 
Most fatal that battle did prove unto thee, 
Though thou was not born. then, my pretty Bessie! 

7 In secrect she nursed him and 'suag'M his pain, 
While he through the realm was believed to be slain : 
At length his fair bride she consented to be, 
And made him glad father of pretty Bessie. 

8 And now, lest our foes our lives should betray, 
VVe c1oth~d ourselves in beggar's array, 
Her jewels she sold, and hither came we : 
All our comfort and c 

4 Along with the nobles that fell at that tide, 
H is eldest sot1, H enry, who fought by his side, 
Was fell ed by a blow he received in the fight-
A blow that for ever deprived him of sight. 

9 And here have we 11 Yc:cl in fortune's despite, 
Though mean, yet contenteve--
~.1he ~id I've left behind me-. 

~ r-.~y mind h,er form shall still l:etain, 
In ~leeping or in waking, 

Until I see my love a~ain, 
For whom my heart is breaking. 

1 (ever I retui:d that way, 
And she should not decline me, 

I evermore will live and stay 
With the 2id I've left behind ,me. 



e William was high upon the yard, 
Rocked by tht: billows to a nd fro ; 

s~n as her well-known voice he heard 
Hs sighed, and ~a.st his eyes bdow : 

The cord slides sw1fcly through his glowing hands, 
And, quick as lightning, 

And, quick as lightning, on the deck he stands. 

3 "Believe not what the landsmen say, . I Who tempL with .doubts thy constant mmd; • 
They'll tell thee sailors, when away, 

Y;t~ ;;:,rtJ~!e"\h~~r!,i~e~~·ey tell thee so, 
For thou art present, 

For thou art present wheresoe'er I go. 

37 

- I 

4 " Oh, Susan, Susan, lovely dear, 
1\-~y vows for !!Ver true remain; 

Let me kiss off that falling t~ar­
\Ve only part to meet agam. 

Change as-ye list, ye winds, my heart shall be 
The faithful compass, 

1'he faithful compass that still points to thee." 

5 The boatswain .1nve the dreadful word, 
The sails then- swelling bosoms spread ; . 

No longer must ~e stay on board: 

T~h1~~~ri~~~~i;~~J~~; ;o~~f:ohi~nhd~aa; 
"Adieu ! " she cries, and waves her lily hand. 



t I t 

WW ~rm TIHr~JEIE W©©~ M~IlNJE~~ 

• round, So we'Jl go dance :i round; And he that is a bul-ly, bul-ly boy, Come, 

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2 We care not for your martial men 
That do the state disdain ; 

pledge me on this ground,a·grounet; 
Although they cut me to the root, 
Next year again I will be seen 
To bud my branches fresh and green 
And you, fair maid, cannot do so. 
For, when your beaut)· once does go 
Then will it never more be seen, 
As 1 with my branches cau grow j"TC( :n. 



oh, Greensleeves was all my joy! And oh, Greensleeves was my de-light ! And oh, Greensleeves was my heart of gold! And who but my b. - dy Grcem.lcc\'CS ! 

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2 I bought thee kerchers to thy head, 
That were wrought fine and gallantly; 

I kept thee booth at board and bed. 
Which cost my purse well favoredly. 

For oh, Greensleeves, &c. 

3 I bought thee petticoats of the best, 
The cloth so fine as might be; 

I gave thee jewels for thy chest : 
And all this cost I spent on thee. 

For oh, Greensleeves, &c. 

41 

4 Thy smock of silk, both fair and white, 
With gold embroidered gorgeously; 

Thy petticoat of senda! right : 
And these I bought thee gladly. 

For oh, Greensleeves, &c. 

5 Greensleeves, now farewell ! adieu ! 
God I pray to prosper thee ! 

For I am still thy lover true: 
Come once o.gain and love me ! 

For oh, Greensleeves, &c. 



He turn'd his face unto1he wall, 
As deadly pa.llgs he fell ;n : 

"'Adieu ~ adieu! adieuto you aTI ! 
Adieu to Barb_ara A11en ! ,_, -

All in the merry month of May, 
Wl)en green buds they were swellin', 

Young Jemmy Grove on his death-bed lay, 
For love of B;irbara Allen. 

.S· 

So slowly, slowly she came up, 
And slowly she came nigh him; 

And all she said when there she came : 
"Young man, I think you're dying ! " 

7. 
As she w.as w:tlklng·~·~r 1ht6efds · 

She heard -the bell a. knellin' J 
Anti ~very. ;.u.oke. 'did seem tii say, 

1
. ' U~worthy Barbara Allen! ii 

When h~ wa.s· clem.i, and -laid iJ.1 'g~ave-,_ 
Her bea1t was __ str_uck.-with sorrow~~-­

" 0 m.other: mother, make my-bf.it. 

"Farewell,'' she said: ''"ye vir_gins ftH, 
And shun the fanJt· I fell in; 

Henceforth take warning by tbe fall 
Of cruel Barbara Allen !" · For I shall die to-~uorrow ! ·'' ·.: · 

42 



l··q 

T 

" 
,,I 

I . 

I .· 

I. Of all the girls that are so sm::uri There's none like pretty Sal - ly, She is the dar-ling of my 

)l~o/fn~~~~~ m . .:'~84~~~-~. 
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heart, And lives in al - ley: There is no la - dy in the land l s half as sweet as 

Sal-ly; She is the darling of my heart, And lives in our al - ley. 

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Iler father he makes cabbage-nets, 
And through the streets does cry them; 

Her mother she sells laces long 
To such as please to buy them : 

But sure such folk can have no part 
In such a girl as Sally; 

She is the darling, &c. 

3. 
When she is by I leave my work, 
I love her so sincerely; 

My master comes, like any Turk, 
And bangs me most severely : 

But let him bang long as he will, 
I'll bear it all .for Sally; 

She is the darling, &c. 

4. 
Of all the days are in the week, 
I dearly love but one day; 

And that's the day that comes betwixt 
A Saturday and Monday ; 

For then I'm dressed in all my best, 
To walk abroad with Sally ; 

She is the darling, &c. 

5. 
l\ry master carries me to church, 
And often I am blamM, 

Because I leave him in the lurch 
Soon as the text is named : 

I leave the church in sermon-lime, 
And slink away to Sally ; 

She is the darling, &c. 

6. 
When Christmas comes about again, 
Ob, then I shall have money ; 

I hoard it up and, box and all, 
I'll give unto my honey : 

I would it were ten thousand pounds, 
I'd give it all to Sally : 

She is the darling, &c. 

7. 
My master and the neighbours all, 
Make game of me and Sally ; 

And but for she I'd better be 
A slave, and row a galley : 

But when my seven long years are out, 
Oh, then I'll marry Sally, 

And then how happily we'll live, 
But not in our alley. 

43 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 
!~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 



2 He is dead and gone, bdy, 
He is dead and gone : 

At his head a grass-green turf, 
At his heels a stone. 

44 

3 White his shroud as the mountain snow, 
Larded with sweet flowers, 

Which bewept to the grave did go 
With true-love showers. 



... ,.,, E' AR:. 

weevsT~')ZeWlJ 
2. 

Down by a crystal river side, 
A gallant: bower I espied, 
Where a fair lady made great moan, 

, With many a bitter sigh and groan. 

45 

3· 
"Alas!" quoth she," my 16ve's unkind_ 
My sighs and tears he will not mind; 
But he is cruel unto me, 
\Vhich causes all my misery. 

5. 
The lady round the meadow ran, 
And gathered Rowers as they sprang; 
Of every sort she there did pull, 
Until she got her apron full. 

+· 
" Soon after he had gai r eel my heart, 
He cruelly did from me part; 
Another maid he does pursue, 
And to his vows he bids adieu." 

6. 

The green ground served as a bed, 
And flowers a pillow for her head; 
She laid her down and nothing spoke, 
Alas ! for love her heart was broke. 



2. If I admire or praise too much,_ 
That fault you may forgive me: 

Or if my hands had strayed to touch, 
Then justly might you leave me. 

I ask'd you leave, you bade me 10\·e ; 
Is 't now a time to chide me? 

No, no, no, T'll love you still, 
\Vhat fortune e'er betide me! 

3. If I have wronged you, say wherein, 
And I wilJ soon amend it ; 

In recompense of such a sin, 
Here is my heart, I'll send il ! 

If that will not your mercy move, 
Then for my life I care not; 

Then, oh, then, torment m.e still, 
And take rny life, and spare not! 



2. In a jessamine bower I 
(When the bean was in flower, 

And zephyrs breothed odours around) 
Lov'd Celia she sat, 
With her song and spinet, 

And she charm'd all the grove with her sound. 

clear ; When the swal-lows a - main .'.'J"im-bly skim o'er the plain, And our sha-clows like 

gi - ants ap - - pear. 

3. Rosy bowers she sung, 
While the harmony run~. 

And the bees they all Autt ring arrive; 
The industrious bees, 
From the flowers and the trees 

Gently hum with their sweets to their hive. 

47 

4. The gay god of love 
As he flew o'er the grove, 

By zephyrs conducted along, 
.A.s she touched on the strings, 
He beat time with his wings, 

While echo repeated the song. 

5. 0 ye mortals be\\'::tre 
I low ye venture too nl'ar ! 

Love doubly is armed to wound ; 
Your fate you can shun, 
For you're surely undone 

If you rashly approach near the sound. 



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2. 

The broom-man maketh his living most sweet 
'Vith carrying brooms from street to street : 

Chorus. 
'Vho would desire a pleasanter thing 
Than all day long doing nothing but sing? I 

3

. I "' I The chimney-sweeper all the long day The cobbler he sits cobbling till noon. He singcth and sweepeth the soot away: And cobbleth his shoes till they be done: Chorus. C!ton1s. 
Yet when he comes home, although he be weary, Yet doth he not fear, and so doth he say; 
With his sweet wife he maketh himself full merry. For he knows his work will soon decay. 

6. The husbandman all day goeth to plough, 
And when he comes back he serveth his sow : 

Clwrm. Jle moileth, and moileth, all the long year, 
How can he be merry and make good cheer? 

7. The serving-man waiteth from street to street, 
With blowing his nails and beating his feet ; 

Chorus. And serveth for forty shillings a year, 
That 'tis impossible to make good cheer. 

8. Who liveth so merry and maketh such sport 
As those that be of the poorest sort ? 

Clwru1. The poorest sort, wheresoever they be, 
They gather together. by one, two, and three. 

S· 
The merchant~rnan doth sail on the seas, 
And lie on the ship-board with little ease: 

Chorus. 
Always in doubt the rock is near, 
How can he be merry and make good cheer? 



2 Strike up, says Wat,-Agreed, says Mat, 
And l prithee, fiddler, play; 

Content, says IIorlge, and so says Madge, 
For this is a holiday. 

Then every lad did dolf 
II is hat unto his Jass, 

And every girl did curtsey, curtsey, 
Curtsey on the grass. 

3 You're Out, says Dick ;-Not I, says Nick, ...J. Then, afier an hour, they went to a bower, 5 Good night, says H::t.rry,-Good night, says 
'Twas the fiddler played it wrong: And played for ale and cakes, Good night, says Dolly to John; [Mary, 

'Tis true, says Hugh, and so says Sue, And kisses, too- until they were due Good night, says Sue to l1er sweethe:ut 
And sq says every one, The lasses held the stakes. Good night, says every one. [Hugh, 

The fiddler then began The girls did then begin Some walked, and some did run, 
To play the tune again, To qunrre1 with the men, Some loitered on the "ay, 

And every girl did trip it, trip it, And bade them take tlteir kisses back, 
Trip it to the men. And give them their own again. 



Phil · !is on the new made hay, Fair, but lone · ly 1till she lay, Wast • ing all the sum· mer day In me . Ian . cho - ly 

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HAR.VEST~ HOMJE 

'} For staying while dinner is cold and hot, 
And pudding and dumpling are burnt to pot ? 
Burnt to pot-burnt to pot ? 
And pudding and dumpling are burnt to pot? 

.bJ 

4. We'll drink off our liquor while we can stand! 
And hey for the honour of Old England ! 
Old England !-Old England ! 
And hey for the honour of Old England ! 






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